Savor Diet: Meditation for Weight Loss

By Nicole German (RD, LD)

2778-savor-mindful-eating-diet.jpgLast week, I wrote about mindful eating which reminds me of another diet book called, “Savor: Mindful Eating, Mindful Life” by Vietnamese Zen Buddhist Thich Nhat Hanh and Doctor and Dietitian Lilian Cheung.

The book combines Buddhist spirituality with nutrition facts. Religion and science in one book? Let’s see how well they gel.

The Basics

Nhat Hanh reviews mediation techniques in the book to help us become more mindful, slow down, and think more about what we are putting into our bodies. The meditations center around the core of Buddhism which is all about becoming completely aware of oneself and your surroundings.

The book gives detailed instructions on how to figure out what is blocking you from being completely mindful when you eat and how to overcome those obstacles. Nhat Hanh discusses stress and emotional eating as well as becoming mindful in everyday life.

The nutritionist, Lilian Cheung, advises specific diet and exercise guidelines to go together with the meditations. She gives readers an idea of how to shop at the grocery store and some simple recipe ideas. The nutrition approach is vegetarian based, and scientifically backed. However, this part of the book is a little basic and you can get this information almost anywhere.

The authors also get the reader to think about where food comes from when you are eating it. Perhaps if we take more time to think about and choose where our food comes from, we become more mindful and appreciative of our eating in the process.

Conclusion

The Savor Diet may not be for everyone. Those who strictly follow another religion or those not willing to explore a more spiritual side of dieting, may not like this method. But, for many of us, I see this book as a great tool to explore a completely different dieting method that may prove to be highly effective.

The book can be found at Amazon here.

5 Comments

  1. Duane

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  2. Ninja-Weapons

    I liked your review. I also read the title too fast and thought it said “Salvador Diet.”

    Reply
  3. Health Coaching

    really good article!!its very nice to read a book that combine religion and science..I really recommend this book for all people who want to go in a meditation.

    Reply
  4. Melissaox4

    good

    Reply
  5. Mondo Samu

    Hello, and thank you for posting this review of “Savor”. I found it though G+, and always love seeing what others write about the book. I’m very biased, as the book worked extremely well for me, in my life.

    I don’t think anyone should be scared off of this book for it’s “spirituality” or it’s simple dietary information. These two things are, in my opinion, EXACTLY what makes the book a success!

    I feel it’s NOT a diet book at all, it’s a book about (as the title states) mindful eating, and mindful living. It’s a diet book in the sense that whatever you eat constitutes your “diet” but it doesn’t really advocate a particular “gimmick” or what most people think of as a “Diet”, meaning a fad or trick way of losing weight fast. It’s not pushing a “program” to be used for a short term, but rather a lifestyle you can adopt for the rest of your life.

    Instead it advocates basic smart eating principles and exactly what you said – paying attention to what you are putting in your body and how you are living.

    It doesn’t push you to become a vegetarian, but let’s you know that you may find yourself choosing this lifestyle because if you are practicing mindfulness many people find it difficult to focus the attention on where their food comes from and then eat meat.

    Mindfulness is not a Buddhist thing. Sure, it is probably the MOST central aspect of Buddhism, but nearly all religions utilize mindfulness. In fact, most people would argue Buddhism isn’t a religion anyhow. There are many Christian Buddhists, who firmly consider themselves to be Christian but utilize Buddhist philosophy. But that’s another topic. 😉

    Anyhow, thanks again. For me, I have been a life-long over-eater. A mindless eater. I’ve tried countless diets and programs and workouts and such. The simple ideas put forth in “Savor” lead me to lost over 100 pounds in less than a year and it was practically EFFORTLESS!

    Warm regards!

    Reply