The GenoType Diet: Complete Review

By Mike Howard

genotype-diet

Nutritional Genomics seems to be the future of nutritional science.

In time, we will be able to take the guesswork out of which foods/nutrients will work best for individuals under virtually any circumstance.

The GenoType Diet, by Dr. Peter D’adamo, suggests that eating based on our genetic make-up is the key to optimal health, fat loss and other desirable attributes.

Revolutionary or a Flawed Attempt?

One of the most formidable flaws of today’s diet book is the one-size-fits all mentality. Ie. diet X is the best/only/easiest/all of the above diet for everyone… all the time. Hence, it is refreshing to see a diet book that makes an attempt to customize eating plans based on a factor that is central to our being – our genetics.

On the flipside, this is the “Blood-Type guy”. Eat Right for your Type scored big with the book-buying public but drew the ire of academics for its lousy science. Regardless, this is a different book and I was determined to approach it with the utmost of objectivity.

Dr. D’adamo paints a very easy-to-understand and yet very clever explanation on our genetic make-up works and how/to what degree we can alter/change it. He compares our genetic codes to a town meeting, whereby we have the capacity to turn up the volume on good genes and silence the bad ones.

Here’s How It Works:

There are 6 different geno-types, each one outlining characteristics such as; body type, traits, strengths, weaknesses and disease predispositions. They are as follows:

  1. GenoType 1: The Hunter
    Tall, thin, and intense, with an overabundance of adrenaline and a fierce, nervous energy that winds down with age. Hunters have swift immune systems which is great on one hand but makes them prone to auto-immune disorders on the other.
  2. GenoType 2: The Gatherer
    Full-figured, even when not overweight, the Gatherer struggles with body image in a culture where thin is “in.” With a “Whoever dies with the most wins” motto, Gatherers have thrifty genes whose primary goal is to hang on to every ingested calorie for dear life — literally.
  3. GenoType 3: The Teacher
    Strong, sinewy, and stable, with great chemical synchronicity and stamina, the Teacher is built for longevity — given the right diet and lifestyle. The Teacher represents the third basic response to a challenging world: altruism. “All you need is love” is the Teachers’ motto, and their immune systems reflect it. Teachers are able to tolerate a wide variety of unfamiliar bacteria, viruses, and microbes, avoiding the hair-trigger symptoms. Unfortunately, they sometimes welcome infectious elements that they would do better to repel.
  4. GenoType 4: The Explorer
    Muscular and adventurous, the Explorer is a biological problem solver, with an impressive ability to adapt to environmental changes and a better-than-average capacity for gene repair. They are good at adapting to different conditions but are vulnerable to hormonal imbalances.
  5. GenoType 5: The Warrior
    Long, lean, and healthy in youth, the Warrior is subject to bodily rebellion in midlife. If Warriors are physically active, their metabolism burns hot; when they lead a sedentary life, they tend to put on the pounds with alarming speed.
  6. GenoType 6: The Nomad
    A GenoType of extremes, with a great sensitivity to environmental conditions — especially changes in altitude and barometric pressure — the Nomad is vulnerable to neuromuscular and immune problems. Yet a well-conditioned Nomad has the enviable gift of the ability to control caloric intake and age gracefully.

There are a series of evaluations/questionnaires offered to help determine which type you are. For each type, there is a description of disease susceptibilities, a metabolic profile, an immune system profile and do’s and don’ts.

Genotype Evidence?

If that old bird from the Wendy’s commercials were still around, she would probably ask “WHERE’S THE SCIENCE?”

It would seem logical that we would be evolutionarily geared towards certain diets. It would also seem logical to assume that we can make the most of our genetic potential by eating the right way. In this sense, I agree with the global concept that we can counter genetic predispositions through proper eating. The specifics of the diet however are puzzling.

It just doesn’t jibe with me that my blood type, the shape of my head or the length of my index finger in relation to my ring finger (some of the traits that determine our geno-types) would be sufficient enough data to determine whether certain foods are toxic or healthy.

As an example, according to my profile I am Hunter. In my list of foods, Atlantic salmon is considered toxic to me, while Chinook salmon is a superfood. Huh? I was also devastated to learn that kangaroo and opossum are to be avoided for my type.

The problem with me attempting to rubbish the concept, however is that I am neither a geneticist, an anthropologist a nutritionist or an anthronutritionalgeneticist (I don’t think such a title exists, but hey it sounds cool).

So rather than speculate, I asked an expert on the subject of Nutritional Genomics. The professor (who asked to remain anonymous) told me that he is not aware of any such evidence to support D’Adamo’s claims.

Another red flag is that D’Adamo did not include any journal references and there are none to be found on his website. This leaves me to conclude that he has presented interesting but unproven ideas.

Overall Impression

It’s a bit of a task to get through the book and to fully understand the principles (at least for me it was). I think it gives a wonderful overview of the relationship between our genes our pre-natal environment, our bodies, and our environment.

The idea of eating for your own personal genetic code is going to have a bright future when it comes to nutritional science. I don’t think this particular concept is it though. Too many questions still abound about the specifics of his suggestions. There aren’t enough scientific rationalizations to be able to make such specific food selections – at least not any that I know of.

Also, this book is a bit like the last episode of the Sopranos. I was left thinking “That’s it? That’s how it ends? There were no meal plans, recipes or specific guidelines. I later figured out that you have to go to the website and pay for that information.

The Verdict

It wouldn’t hurt to give it a try just for something different – the guidelines are pretty sensible regardless of the geno-type.

Just don’t put too much credence in the science behind it.

78 Comments

  1. Rob

    I’ve done this diet for 8 months now having seen fantastic results in friends. I have never been so helathy in my life, so I can’t say enough good things about it. The science seems logical too. I don’t need any ‘scientist’ to tell me anything. I’ve seen it work with my own eyes.

    Reply
  2. Sarah

    I have done both Blood Type O diet and Hunter Genotype with absolutely amazing results- for years. I only spent money on the book and the test kit for 10 bucks. I have tested many of my clients who have all had amazing results when they do it. Don’t knock it til ya try it, for at least a month. and if it is not for u cool. it has worked for many. and science is not always right. it changes all the time. can’t rely on that. personal experience is the only way to “know”.

    Reply
  3. East Coast Fisherman

    Really?! No salmon in the Atlantic? Wow, you better tell that to the salmon fisheries in Nova Scotia, Vermont, and all along the upper East Coast! I wonder what they have been catching for the last 200 years!!!

    Please get your facts straight before you post such foolishness!

    Reply
    • buddyluv

      Atlantic Salmon is actually a “trout” not a member of the Salmonid family, as pacific salmon and char are. Learn to use google before you look foolish yourself. 🙂

      Reply
    • Erl

      the point is the genus of ‘ Atlantic Salmon,’ is different than Pacific and is by genetic biomarkers not a true salmon. They could have been called Bison, but they’re NOT Bison, either.

      Reply
  4. Tilly

    I tried my warrior diet for a bit and found that without meat or dairy, my blood sugar would plummet. (I have hypoglycemia.) I tried the correct nuts and legumes to bring it back up on several occasions, especially after exercise, but it fell short. I am doubting that this is credible. Also, there is no such thing as Atlantic salmon!! It’s a misnomer. Salmon comes from the Pacific, so no one should be eating “Atlantic” salmon. It’s as much salmon as krab dip is king crab!

    Reply
    • Erl

      Wild Atlantic ,’ salmon,’ is as healthy as any fish; but NOT farmed fish of any species. If you are truly a WARRIOR, you could not fail on the WARRIOR diet. How did you determine WARRIOR status ? from the book measurements ? I recommend you purchase SWAMI software program. It include Geno Type Strength Testing tools you cannot get from the book alone. I am an ND and myself and fellow practitioners concluded we were certain types, but several turned out to be a different type later using SWAMI. This is pure Science, epigenetics will become the way medicine is individualized, for each person.

      Reply
  5. Jesphine

    The impression I get from the latest edition of this book, retitled Change Your Genetic Destiny), is that D’Adamo’s research springs from much prior research by others, including those references listed in the Resources section at the end of the book; and that this work is being continued today by the Human Genome Project, probably among others. I take the Resources list to serve, to at least some degree, as a reference list, as clearly the author has read all these works and presumably drawn information from them. Further, the website contains a huge array of related scientific literature that is so technical, exhaustive, and complex that I blanched just looking at one page, and I was hugely relieved that one could gain benefit from the concepts without having to slog through this veritable jungle of information! For those seeking a doctor’s endorsement, the most obvious one is that expressed in the forward by Tom Greenfield, ND, DO, MIFI. He stands behind the science that went into this book and states that many doctors have successfully employed the precursor to the GenoType Diet, the Blood Type Diet, with their patients. Since the GenoType Diet is simply an expansion on the concepts of the former diet, it would seem to hold similar promise–but I don’t think Greenfield should be expected to speak to this upon the presentation of this new (at the time) book to the public.

    Incidentally, does not the publication of this book offer adequate opportunity for “other scientists to analyse and respond to” D’Adamo’s theories? After all, popular works are just as available to scientists as works published in academic forums. Further, this popular work might well have been preceded by scholarly publications.

    In his book, D’Adamo states, “I developed the concept of the GenoType and identified six GenoTypes by doing statistical analyses of how genes, disorders, and physical traits are known to cluster together. I based my work on the known associations between such traits as, say, fingerprint patterns and particular disorders, leg length and risk for prostate cancer, and tooth shoveling and ancestral diet.” It doesn’t appear that D’Adamo pulled his ideas out of the blue.

    Most importantly, posters criticizing D’Adamo’s concepts surrounding “genotypes” seem to be overlooking the author’s explanation in the book about the specific word he coined, “GenoType,” which has a much broader meaning than “genotype.” The former is the term he most often uses. He explains: “Although in traditional scientific practice the word genotype is used only to describe a person’s actual assortment of genes, I’ve chosen to use the term in a unique way because I believe that we’ve sold ourselves a bit short with this narrow, linear definition. The standard definition refers only to chromosomes, but my own use of the word genotype includes your relationship to the environment [epigenetics], the influence of your family history from very recent times, and effects of your fetal, or prenatal, history…words and concept come together to make something new and completely different: a Genetic Archetype–a GenoType…these GenoTypes [are] older than ethnicity and they don’t necessarily line up with your family patterns.” In the next book section, D’Adamo further clarifies, “There probably aren’t only six GenoTypes. There are probably 7.5 billion–one for every human currently alive…[a]s it happens, the survival strategies we’ve worked out with our 30,000 genes, our common prenatal experience, and our 100,000 years on the planet have fallen into six basic patterns. I can’t tell you why there are six any more than I can tell you why there are four blood types–it just happened that way.”

    D’Adamo makes clear that one can test “very strong,” “strong,” “positive,” or weak for one’s GenoType profile. However, one does not have to be a strong match to fit completely into that category or to successfully employ the guidelines for that category, because BASIC PATTERNS, as mentioned above, are the key words. As a case in point, I do not match most of the biometric characteristics associated with my GenoType, but almost all the descriptors in the other categories hit the nail on the head. And my experience strongly indicates that the recommended diet and exercise program hold validity for me.

    Will this science evolve and refine itself? Undoubtedly. Will we find ways to fine-tune the guidelines further to more tightly suit each individual? I’m certain that, over time, we will. But does D’Adamo’s work have a basis in fact, and does it have value just as it stands? I am convinced that it does, for both logical and experiential reasons.

    I’ve been on the diet/exercise program for eighteen days and my former, often severe digestion problems, which for years have been almost daily events, have been virtually nonapparent during this whole time.

    On another note, about complaints that D’Adamo is trying to rake in cash by selling needless supplements, both mainstream and naturopathic doctors widely agree that supplements have become vital components of complete health in our modern industrial society because we tend not to eat food in the fresh, non-chemical-ridden, and relatively unprocessed state that people did in the past. In addition, our entire environment has become much more toxic, taxing the body in new ways that cry out for more support. Also, some of the ingredients in the supplements may have been commonly available as food sources to our ancestors but are quite exotic to us today. As I see it, D’Adamo is simply offering a relatively few basic supplement alternatives to some of the multitudes offered in stores and on websites (products that everyday Americans spend thousands on yearly); D’Adamo offers two basic “multi’s” that don’t conflict with any particular body chemistry, as well as several products to address more particular needs and that suit each GenoType’s specific body chemistry. I don’t think D’Adamo is implicitly recommending that each person take all of the supplements offered for his/her GenoType; the website says to consult with one’s health care provider before beginning to take any supplement. I think the idea is to take just that which you determine you need. If you really could somehow function optimally without any supplementation, I’m quite sure that D’Adamo would not recommend that you take these, or any, supplements.

    Finally, about posters’ complaints that you need to pay for meal plans, in theory it might be nice to have such plans included in the book; however, would that double the size and the cost of the book, and would some people prefer to pay less for the book and devise their own plans instead? Granted, the cost for the web info. that posters cite does sound over the top, and offering separate books with meal plans for each GenoType instead would probably be the ideal. But are many of us not creative enough that we can look at the foods recommended for our types and devise meal plans ourselves based on that information? I certainly have done fine without any meal plans.

    For those posting concerns and skepticism, I think a closer look at the book and the website can actually answer to these objections pretty well.

    Reply
    • Erl

      The, ‘ author,’ Doctor Peter J D’Adamo, is an ND, a Professor of Clinical Studies at Bridgeport School of Medicine and Adjunct/Visiting Professor of Clinical Nutrition at various schools, advanced studies in Epigenetics, the keynote speaker at the International Conference on Epigenetics; and, an expert in Human Individuality. He has conducted 30 years of clinical research into nutrition, lifestyle and is a practising licensed clinician. He didn’t merely read other people’s work and quote it, he has done decades of hard in the lab research. In any Journal of Medicine entry you will find credits to reference material. My own thesis, had dozens of credited references, that supported my individual thought and findings. Dr. D’Adamo’s work is protected under ,’ Intellectual Property,’ legislation. One does not secure that designation by quoting others’ work.

      Reply
  6. Anonymous

    Well, I got the book for $2.99 (US) at a thrift store and don’t plan on shelling out for recipes (I can cook just fine0 or supplements. I matched up with the Exporer genotype very well, and looking at his list of foods, almost every one of the “toxic” ones have been upsetting my body for years! I’ve already been staying away from many of them, at least much of the time. I live in Alaska so you’d better believe I have no acces to kudzu, ostrich, or anything too far out of the norm (however, all the wild salmon, reindeer, and moose I like, courtesy of my friends). It comes down to eating healthy foods in general and listening to your body. I’ll just use his lists for Explorer to experiment and fine tune the list I already made for myself, see what happens. His research may or may not be well substantiated, but what he says about my type does match up with what I have discovered so far about my own body’s preferred food, so there might be some nuggets of usefulness buried in there.

    Reply
    • Erl

      His research is solid, 30 years of it and continuing. He remains a licensed clinician, directs the D’Adamo Clinic and is a Professor of Clinical Studies. In our early years most of us can withstand wrong diet, but those effects compound and as age increases our bodies are not as forgiving. A car can miss a few oil changes when new, but fct csnnot be escaped… cheers

      Reply
  7. Sue

    I think you are correct.
    The diet sounds intriguing since most of us know that some food or another just don’t agree with our bodies. But I question why there are SO MANY needed supplements and for big buck$? You would think that the diet changes alone should be beneficial if that is how it is intended to be. Our Hunter-Gatherer forefathers certainly were Not on supplements!

    Reply
    • Cdub

      All about making a buck.

      Reply
    • Erl

      I use very few supplements; but ALL supplements are not made equal, either. Dr.D’Adamo’s supplements are derived from the highest quality ingredients, organic, not containing cheap fillers, or the industrial machine lubricant Magnesium Stearate, ( feather derived,), nor the Carcinogenic Carageenan. The supplements are formulated for efficacy, carefully balanced, and in human friendly forms. I do not work for the organization nor derive any benefits for waxing positive about this work.

      Reply
  8. Sue

    I think you correct.
    The diet sounds intriguing since most of us know that some food or another just don’t agree with our bodies. But I question why there are SO MANY needed supplements and for big buck$? You would think that the diet changes alone should be beneficial if that is how it is intended to be. Our Hunter-Gatherer forefathers certainly were Not on supplements!

    Reply
  9. Lynda

    There is no packaged food, ashok, and it is a healthy diet.

    People love to comment even when they’ve done no research and have not even seen the diet.

    Reply
  10. Lynda

    The diet is stupid on the face of it, but I did it because my sister did, and it WORKED on my fat ass.

    Make of it what you will.

    Reply
  11. katie

    Hello,
    replying in general here, i just wanted to remark that you don’t have to pay to get the info anymore than you have to pay for jenny craig or weightwatchers. U do have to buy the book. the book i have just bought was 5 dollars, and all i need to do the diet. So don’t know why people are acting like that is the case. Also as far as clinical trials are concerned, to me it is like the american hearts association. You have to pay alot o money for it. A lot of foods qualify for the amrican hearts association logo, but they have to pay to have it so they dont bother. clinical trials involves the same, same with getting FDA approved which is why alot of people who perscribe to natural diets and alternative medicine don’t always look at those things.

    I am still hoping to remain completely objective though. I am going to start on this diet because i know so many people who it works for.

    Reply
  12. Ashok

    Once again you’ve produced another post which busts through the nonsense that is out there around health and food.
    More needs to be done to encourage people to eat healthily and knowledge is key because the companies selling packaged food are selling a product and not necessarily the truth.
    Thanks for sharing such a wealth of knowledge with us. Keep on being controversial appropriately. We need more truth and less hype.

    Reply
  13. Allison

    I have been following the Blood Type/Genotype Diet for about 5 years now and it has worked wonders! It does not matter how much it all costs……his theory is 100% right on. I went from a size 10 o 3. I feel amazing! This is the answer and would bet that it will work for anyone.

    I am an O, Gatherer and while sometimes staying away from gluten and dairy is difficult-it is well worth it.

    D’Adamo will change your life….I guarantee it.

    Reply
  14. Christie

    You have to sign up on the Geno Type Website to have access to have information and it costs $4 a week and you have to pay for 13 weeks upfront. After that you can cancel at any time.
    It isn’t worth it to me, because I have done that many times in the past with poor results.

    Reply
    • Erl

      That’s strange, anyone can access the website, foods, recipes, meal planning for free. But even with a nominal charge how on earth does a business operate if it gives everything away. Tobacco and Booze sellers don’t give away their product, nor farmers, fishers, oil companies… Even if your info was correct, which it isn’t, $ 52.00 ?? Really, your health isn’t worth $ 52.00 ?? You buy the Change Your Genetic Destiny book for a few bucks, have a friend help with the measurements, ( in fact, engage 100 friends at no extra cost,) for your own Genotype club and laugh all the way to excellent health.
      But please, don’t say silly inaccurate things that could influence another who really needs the help.

      Reply
  15. mike

    If you have read all the reference books on the resource pages 303-304 of this book, then you’re qualified to slam the book…if not then try it out and let your experience decide. The worst that can happen is you get to try out foods you have never eaten before and figure out that they are good for you and bad for others

    Reply
  16. mike

    virtually impossible to have an omega 6 deficiency on any diet and none of the individualized diets in this book is deficient in Omega 6

    MS Certified Holistic Nutritionist

    Reply
  17. Christopher

    LOL, this is all interesting to read today, 12-31-2008. I find that it is worth a shot to try something else that may or may not work for me as I attempt yet another New Year’s resolution to lose weight. No matter what your goal, it’s all about “rational expectations.” As a white guy, 36yrs old, and at 275#, well, I guess that puts me in the Endomorph category. I’ve been an avid beliver in the Atkins plan and anyone with good memory understands the politics he faced in the 1970’s; the American medical establishment crucified the poor guy. Atkins worked for me when I was young. Today I just can’t survive on 2 **grams** of carbs per day, and that’s what it takes for me to lose weight. Nor can my body tolerate 2 hours of running per day (been there, done that).
    Penn and Teller have a “BS” show on Showtime and they recently did an episode on the logical fallacy of big guys being unhealthy. I have run 5K and 10K races with respectable times for my age. So, I may have a big physique for the rest of my life. That doesn’t mean unhealthy …yet at the same time D’Adamo may be on to something that **might** help me now. It is a crapshoot, but from what I have read, I’m willing to roll the dice and see what happens. I don’t fault the guy for trying to make a buck. Even Susan Powter bursted on to the scene in 1993 and she marketed her program as anti-establishment. Where is she today? The weight-loss biz is a BIZ first …no different than the Catholic church. They are both selling hope in one form or another. I’m rational enough to not give D’Adamo all my money. Same goes for the Pope. Just be smart people!! 😉
    CvL

    Reply
    • Erl

      Your unqualified prejudice could result in you depriving yourself from saving your health. This Dr is solid gold in his motivation and a bloody genius of a doctor and scientist.

      Reply
    • Erl

      Overweight doesn’t mean endomorph. There are a whole bunch of calculations to determine that designation. No offence intended but the Catholic Church is not a viable comparison. It is a market share political, mind control, machine. D’Adamo says we all must take control of ourselves. Religion never gives that message, it wants total control; the most dreadful weapon ever used to invade countries and destroy civilizations.

      Reply
  18. john

    The diet is brainwash!!! I was on it for 3 months and almost died of an omega 6 deficiency. Stay AWAY!!!

    Reply
    • Erl

      The only way you could develop an Omega 6 deficiency would be if you had your mouth sown shut. Omega 6 is a problem of excess not deficiency, responsible for arterial scarring and carotid plaquing. The only way you could almost die in 3 months from any diet, except total fast food diet, would be fasting without water. Just a few facts before telling you your comments are full of holey craponi…. Plain, silly

      Reply
  19. Adventurous Explorer

    I ended up retyping my food list right from the book for my type, eliminating foods I don’t normally eat. Hope this helps!

    Reply
  20. curious gatherer

    Where do I find list of foods tested and new ones to eat and those to limit or avoid?Help!

    Reply
  21. curious gatherer

    I have the book and like it alot. It said that we could go on the website to find a list of all the foods tested and newly discovered foods for our genotype to eat and to limit or avoid but I cant find this information. Can someone send me it please? Thankyou

    Reply
    • Erl

      http://www.dadamo/genodietrecipes/ You’d be better off spending a few bucks and buy the SWAMI EXPRESS software, at DAdamo.com. 6000 recipes. Looking at the lists I cannot think of any other foods, can you ?

      Reply
  22. Weight Loss Programs

    It just feels like D’adamo is flogging a dead horse with the Genotype Diet, which is suffering the same negative press that his Blood Type Diet
    received, and for all the same reasons.

    If you go ahead and spend your hard earned money to gain access to the recipes and other tools for this diet (which is $4 a week, but you have to pay for 13 weeks, so actually it is a $52 investment, plus the cost of the book too) you find that the recipes are quite good. But again, if it is recipes you want then save some money and just buy a good low-carb, low-cal cook book and start cooking.

    Reply
    • Erl

      BTD was published 20 years ago, translated in dozens of languages, the best selling book of all time. Now what hack org paid you or what meds are you not taking, cause you sound like a troll. Clearly, your words show that you know nothing about the content of this 30 year researched book, and other titles, by a licensed physician, respected clinician, Professor of Clinical Studies, Physician of the Year, authority as Epigenetics expert relating to Nutrition, by the International College of Epigenetics. It has naught to do with low carb, low cal, only low risk of debilitating disease. It’s about health not weight loss; that happens when folks get healthy, as millions of testimonies show is the case.

      Reply
  23. Spectra

    Uh, based on the tone of this book, I’m not really sure this “Dr. D’Adamo” who wrote it really knows a whole lot about gene silencing and protein synthesis, etc. I’m guessing that’s why the name of the book is the “GenoType Diet” when he clearly doesn’t base it on actual genotypes.

    Reply
    • Erl

      Dr, D’Adamo is regularly the keynote speaker at the International Conference on Epigenetics. ” This Dr, D’Adamo,” a board certified practising cinician and professor of Clinical Studies, had been doing the hard lab research for 3 decades. His publisher insisted on promoting the diet concept. He has since re-released the work, entitled, ‘ Change Your Genetic Destiny.’ If you had bothered to do a minimal amount of work yourself you wouldn’t be making such silly statements. I’m not sure you ever read it or if you did were not able to grasp that level of intelligent expression. Odd, when some of the most respected minds in clinical medicine have lauded this great tome of work.

      Reply
  24. Brent

    Don’t knock the book or its concepts til you’ve read and understand them…the science behind d’adamo’s books is certainly there…unfortunately, those who’ve never read d’adamo’s books pass his work off as rubbish because of their ignorance

    The term, ‘genotype,’ is indeed used appropriately, as the premise of the book is how specific factors (e.g. nutrients, diet, and lifestyle) effect one’s genes (genotype), thereby altering the expression of those genes (observably, phenotype). Naturally, different gene expressions (e.g. as a result of silencing, RNA interference, et cetera) and different genes themselves require different diets and lifestyles; d’adamo is simply trying to develop diets and lifestyles that promote the optimal expression of one’s genes, which ultimately leads to better health.

    Reply
    • Erl

      Finally an intelligent comment by someone who has actually read the work.

      Reply
  25. Lose weight for life

    I think it is an interesting notion but when you break it down I think it is a pretty crazy idea. We have not been hunter or gathers for thousands of years. If we all had these specific gean types they surely would have been cross bred so many times over the last few thousand years there would no longer be any distinct subsets. It sounds a bit far fetched and the fact there is no supporting evidence makes the claims very week.

    Reply
    • Erl

      Don’t think we’ve had supermarkets for thousands of years Billy Joe Bob. 30 years of hard clinical research has gone into this momentous tome of work. My ancestors were certainly hunters and gatherers and farmers, fishers, 20,000 — 30,000 years ago. The carbon dated artifacts prove that. The categories are just words used to act as headings for , ‘types,’ with specific features. If your theory is correct, why then don’t we just have one blood type instead of 4 with several subtypes ?? Why after all of the passing generations are Black folks lactose intolerant ? Why is chicken fat and buckwheat a recipe for stroke for Jews ? Why are folks ancestrally from different latitudes unable to tolerate certain fats/oils? As I say if you do your research you will find 7 decades of science, 3 of those ardently pursued by Dr. D’Adamo, Professor of Clinical Studies, and Nutrition; licensed practising clinician.

      Reply
  26. James chris

    Genotype Diet is the good for health.I did not read the book but according to the action point of view Genotype diet is good diet that suits for the body.

    Reply
  27. Gabrielle

    I find that the first sign that a so called ‘scientific’ theory has little actual scientific merit is when it does not use correct terminology. ‘Genotype’ is a real term but refers to the actual combination of genes that result in a specific phenotype. For example, the genotype for O blood type is (i,i). You won’t sell any books with that.

    Reply
    • Erl

      You clearly know not of which you speak, leading to a prescription of SILENCE.. Dr. D’ Adamo is a scientist, clinical Professor, authority in Clinical Nutrition, advanced in the Science of Epigenetics as conferred by the International Epigenetics Council.
      What are your qualifications ? clearly you have no appreciation for genetic science; phenotype refers to the set of observable characteristics of an individual resulting from the interaction of its genotype with the environment.
      That’s the worst thing about employing ,’ Strawman,’ tactics; when you haven’t a clue, best to say nothing, as you out yourself.

      Reply
  28. CindySense

    Great review of the diet. I for one do not believe the hype of most diet books. I think regardless what your genetics are, if you choose a healthy diet and exercise regularly you can lose weight and be healthier. Books like the Geno Diet, really don’t care about the health or weight of the “customers”, they just care about the bottom line – the money in their pocketbook.

    Reply
  29. Doufu

    I briefly skimmed through that book in the store around x’mas. It involves a LONG test to determine your type. I find this still a one size fits all approach. Not everyone fits into the type exactly, just like someone mentioned, sort of life sameotype(sp.).

    Reply
  30. Spectra

    This book sounds sort of fishy to me. The descriptions of the different “GenoTypes” are kind of vague…I could be in either the Teacher or the Explorer category while my husband is probably a Warrior. If this book is like the Blood Type book, there are lists of foods that you can and cannot eat, so that’s mostly what’s going to lead to any sort of weight loss. If you can’t eat X, Y, Z and are allowed to eat Q, R, and S, of course you’ll probably lose some weight.

    I’m sort of curious to see what else is in this book, so I may have to check it out to see what foods I “should” be eating.

    I’m betting the next book this guy publishes will be the Zodiac Diet…if you’re a Virgo, you should eat fish and beans but if you’re a Libra, you should eat beef and quinoa or whatever. I’m sure people would buy it.

    Reply
  31. blah

    It sounds like complete junk. It doesn’t even pass the smell test and is not worth further investigation.

    As you rightly note, it appears at first to rest on a logical premise: that humans have evolved in ways that will make certain diets better or worse for them. It then makes a gigantic leap to making specific claims about what diets are better for certain supposed “genotypes.” There is no science supporting these claims. If there were, we would already know about it.

    Reply
  32. Red

    Are people just smoking pot, writing stream of conscious, and getting book deals?

    How does this get published?

    Reply
  33. Supplements Canada

    I am not a fan of any book that doesn’t provide either research or actual exercises that you can try or work on that involves your health. The fact that you have to pay to get any of the information that you can use to apply the diet is ridiculous.

    Reply
    • benjamin

      Tell me. When did you last work for free!

      Reply
    • Erl

      you are clearly mistaken; this is a get healthy, take charge of your own health project. The author is a highly respected physician, a professor of Clinical Studies, Physician of the Year; lauded by the giants in the field of epigenetic research. His 30 years of research continue.

      Reply
  34. Rebecca

    As an aside, the test is actually available for free via the Genotype website, but once you take the test, you have to buy his book to find out what kind of “eating solutions” he has for your particular genome.

    So, reverse #2 & #1 as follows:
    1. Suck readers in by allowing them to take test for free, but giving them no further info.
    2. Pay Dr. D. $$ by purchasing his book, which is backed by no other scientists.

    He provides quite the effective “hook”, no matter what kind of fish you are.

    Reply
    • Erl

      You are totally incorrect. In fact you are simply making it up as you go. UTTERLY UNTRUE !!! By simply going on line you can find all of the info; by subscribing, for FREE, to the monthly newsletter you have access to all info, recipes, etc. There are dozens of professional accolades. He is a USA licensed physician, a professor of Clinical Studies, and Nutrition, a scientist, highly recognized by the International Assoc’n of Epigeneticists. Are yo a paid troll or just a strawman personality ??

      Reply
  35. Judy Wyatt

    If he’s not presenting his theories for other scientists to analyse and respond to, then it’s not science. Science progresses via group effort.

    Just because some multiple-choice test manages to sort people into x number of groups, doesn’t mean that there are actually x groups to divide people among, or that these specific groups represent anything real.

    What I am reading from Mike’s review:
    (1) pay Dr. Peter D’adamo money via buying his book.
    (2) take test that he made up and no other scientist will vouch for.
    (3) pay him money via his website to be able to put his ideas to use.

    Sounds fishy to me (chinook or atlantic salmon, take your pick).

    Reply
    • Erl

      I know what you mean, all of the other medical experts and pharmaceutical companies work for free. Dr. D’Adamo is internationally recognized in Epigenetics and Nutrition, a licensed practising physician, a Professor of Clinical Studies, and Nutrition. Sounds lije you haven’t a clue, just trolling, hacking, for pay or lackof a meaningful life.

      Reply
  36. Tom ( Curcumin Supplement )

    I find this very interesting. I did not know there was much of a relationship between nutrition and genetics, but it does make sense. It’s incredible what studies have shown in terms of how our genetic makeup effects our health in terms of diseases. Hopefully, this type of thing can help improve overall nutrition and health in the future.

    Reply
    • Erl

      A friend , MD, PHD, Medicine, writes treatment protocols for oncologists, worldwide, and while prescribing very select cancer pharmaceuticals, also employs medical grade curcumin, an extract of Turmeric. He is demand because his protocols save lives.

      Reply
  37. Deirdre

    I never fit into any of the categories in these sorts of books, and I hate the idea that we all fit neatly into boxes. Even if there were those “genotypes” once, thousands of years of intermarriage make the idea that we all fit neatly into these categories ridiculous.

    Reply
    • Erl

      we all have blood… names had to be given to distinct groups with particular characteristics. Like after market car parts.. can’t use a Chevy brake on a Ford… If it’s ridiculous how come after thousands, 100’s of 1000’s of years there is not only one blood type, one eye colour, one hair colour ?? You cannot make a conclusion without reading the books. I’m sure your public library has a copy. This is pure science, the only science based book written that includes nutrition. They are NOT diet books, regardless of titles, they are getting as healthy as possible books; translated into dozens of languages; written by a physician who is a scientist committed to human individuality, as was his father, James, also a Connecticut physician.

      Reply
  38. Quito

    I’ve not read this book, but from a marketing point of view – people love new taxonomies that place someone into a somewhat flattering category. You get a new identity, and probably meaningless insight that gives an afterglow of understanding…

    Reply
    • Erl

      Do you belong to the Monte Python troup, silly talking… a strawman spouting a fool’s jibberish. Proving words can be assembled into such a fashion ad to say NOTHING !!!

      Reply
  39. Rebecca

    This is a great review – I’d looked into the online diet but never seen the book version, so this sheds a lot of light on the principles of the Genotype Diet. Does D’Adamo state any of his own research as back-up for his plan? Sometimes I wonder where an author comes up with their ideas for a book and/or diet like this. If there really is no science to back it up, does that mean people are willing to buy the next-best-thing whether or not it’s proven to work?

    Reply
    • benjamin

      Would people take the time to read a thing before making comments about it? Or are we too lazy?

      Reply
    • Erl

      His books are the culmination of his own 3 decades of hard research. He is a licensed physician in Connecticut, professor of clinical studies and Nutrition, an expert, recognized internationally in epigenetics as related to human individuality, nutrition and lifestyle. Over 20 years his books have been translated into dozens of languages and remain best sellers. It is pure science.

      Reply
  40. MizFit

    Im intrigued enough to want to read this yet, when reading the types above, think:

    which one am I? would I be were I not working daily to be healthy and stay fit?

    Kind of like the somatypes. People often tell me Im an ectomorph or mesomorph but, if I ate junk and sat on my arse more than I do now, Id be an endomorph.

    or would I?

    hard to know—but looks like something Id wanna read hard science behind or not.

    THANKS FOR THE REVIEW as Id not even heard of the book.

    Reply
    • Erl

      Read the book, your health will thank you. Dr. D’Adamo has committed his life to research and patient care. This is hard science !!

      Reply